A scrappy retro coloured quilt

retro fabricsRemember these fabrics I bought?  Well I finally finished the quilt I had planned for them.    I sourced the rest of the fabrics from patchwork stores, but these made a good bit of inspiration.

There was very little method in this quilt – the only rule was that I’d  make blocks which were 13″ tall and join them to make strips, each strip being the width of the quilt. When I had enough strips to complete the quilt, I just joined them together.   To make the blocks, I basically just sewed bits on bits and if it got too wide or tall, I’d trim off sections and use them to start the next section.   It was a lot of fun, but I’m desperate to do something more orderly for my next quilt.

scrappy retro quilt

 

The quilting is all ‘in the ditch’.   I was originally planning to do different decorative quilting stitches in each square, but it became apparent very early on that it would look far too busy.

One of my quilting friends made the observation on the finished product “lots of the fabrics are really ugly, but together they really work”.   As this was my intention, I guess I will call it a success.

 

My son fell in love with it and decided to have it on his bed.   Now his bedroom is Star Wars black and red and it looks kind of odd in there.   But hey, I’m just glad that it’s being loved.

scrappy retro quilt bed

Fossicking for fabrics

Some sewing friends recently recently introduced me to The Fabric Cave.   It combines four of my favourite things:  not for profit, supported employment, upcycling and sewing supplies.   The look and smell of this place evokes memories of 50 Nana’s sewing rooms.   Their stock has all been donated by people culling their stashes –  ready to find new lives in the a different sewing room.   They even have UFOs ready for some renewed inspiration.

My most recent trip there was with two dear friends – one of them the author behind Misty Cow Designs blog. How lovely it is to go shopping with people who ‘get it’.   I arrived with some odds and sods and one of my mother’s UFOs – appliqued squares for a patchwork quilt she started 20 years ago and then went off the idea.   She’d held onto it all this time because there was too much work in it to part with – but the prospect of it finding new love somewhere else spurred her into donating.’

My friends and I each spent about $50 and came out with very different supplies for our wide and varied interests.

Among my haul was this stash of vintage coloured patchwork fabrics.  I’d found myself looking at all the patchwork scraps and stumbled across a very retro piece;  I’ve been wanted to make a modern vintage quilt for some time and here was my start.    I immediately found a complimentary piece – and another – and another.     All the pieces seemed to jump out at me for re-use.   Yes, I was rather excited.    Because all the pieces are different sizes, I’ll probably go with some type of random pieced scrappy quilt.

retro fabrics

The top left piece was my starting piece of inspiration.  And the rest just followed

mid century modern fabric

OK, this one isn’t going to match my modern vintage quilt, but I couldn’t leave it behind.  I have no idea what I will do with it because at 25cm, it’s fairly narrow.   But I’m sure it will speak to me eventually.

Can’t wait for my next trip there.

Pram Blanket

There’s a baby girl due shortly and my family are bursting with excitement.    I was looking for a simple idea for a newborn gift and decided on a pram blanket.   (Jadie, don’t look!)   This is likely to be the first of many baby gifts leaving my machine in the short term.

I knew the mum has decided that she wants to avoid pastel colours, so I went for the vibrant colours in this piece of fabric from the patchwork store.  The zebra print back is a velvety, soft, fleecy fabric which I just want to stroke.  Continuously.  Lime green binding lifts the edges and also compliments the zebra print.

It was all very simple really.   I layered the two prints back to back, some random safety pins in the centre and dressmaking pins held them together while I put the binding on.    I was wondering if I’d need to put some random stitches through the blanket to hold the layers in place, but it seems to be doing just fine without.

Hope she likes it

pram blanket

A Teenage Boy Quilt.

This was my first quilt.   It was 2011 and my son had well and truly grown out of the beautiful appliqued alphabet quilt made for him by my mother.   I explained to my son that I was making a ‘teenage boy’ quilt and the name stuck.   “A Teenage Boy Quilt” is now it’s official name.

He had a very strong love for Star Wars at the time, so his room had lots of Star Wars merchandise around.  It was painted red because he wanted it to look like the lava planet Mustafar.   I wondered if the red walls would send him a bit crazy, but he’s been fine.

Anyway, the red, black and white was chosen because a) it would compliment the Star Wars decoration and b) I love working with vibrant colours.   The quilt is finished with ‘in the ditch’ quilting and has a very soft and light batting.    He loves it.

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A new quilt

As the daughter of a quilter, I find it ironic that I have to make my own bed quilts.   But mum’s quilts are handmade works of art, whereas I want quilts to snuggle into and keep me warm.

My latest quilt was inspired by bedroom colours which didn’t quite work well together.    It all started when I added an artwork featuring greys and warm neutrals to a room which was only warm neutrals.  When the new grey bed head failed to bring it all together, I went hunting for patchwork fabrics which incorporated all the colours in my room.

I chose the chevron pattern because of the masculine feel.  Hubby doesn’t get terribly excited about quilts (do any men?) but is OK with them if I go for something which isn’t ‘girly’.

The quilting was done by me on long arm machine at Hobbysew, Top Ryde.    To date, I’ve quilted everything on my domestic machine but a queen sized quilt was far too big for me to contemplate doing at home.     The staff at Hobbysew were excellent and provided a one day training course before I started.    Quilting this quilt took the best part of a day – quite exhausting, but very rewarding.

Now I’m looking forward to the nights warming up a bit so that we can use the quilt.   In the meantime, the feather doona will have to do.

Robyn

chevron close chevron quilt